Rome

    . No one really knows much about this Roman chronicler of Roman methods of warfare. Hew rote two tomes and that is all we have of him.: Epitoma rei militaries  and Digesta Artis Mulomedicinae, a treaty on animal medicine. .“The Lacedaemonians, the Athenians, the Marsians, the Samnites, the Peligni….Did not the Epirots acquire in former times […]

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The Unintended Consequences of Conquest.

by Daniel Russ on February 12, 2014

      When the Romans were building out permanent roads, connecting the kingdoms under their purview around the Mediterranean, Christianity was rising and supplanting and threatening Roman hegemony. Rome was expanding as fast as it was changing. And not everything the Romans transported came with legionnaires. Rome was the worlds biggest buyer of foreign […]

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The Short Lived Chaotic Dacian Empire.

October 30, 2013
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  Decebalus, King Of Dacia   In 43 AD, Claudius invaded Britain, eyeing the island nation as a source for wealth and of course the glory of battles won and expanded Roman territory. It had been a century since Julius Caesar added thousands of miles to the Roman Empire. Claudius got what he never wanted, […]

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In Early Rome Celtic Mercenaries Had No Fidelity To Anyone, Even Their Own Tribesmen.

October 18, 2013

    Brennus, Celtiberia Chief Most of Western Europe from the 5th Century BC to the 1st Century was a pastiche of  fiefdoms and tribal bands and clans and allegiances. The Gauls or the Celtic people, as the Romans referred to them were a widely diverse group that for some reason, began raiding Roman Imperial […]

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Forget The Comparisons Between The United States And Ancient Rome. The Differences Are More Telling.

January 2, 2013

    I love the comparisons historians draw between the United States and the Roman Empire. As the turn of the Millennium fades into the past the year-end brings knee jerk dramatic analyses of the last twelve months. Increasingly, and almost inevitably there is a comparison between the 230-year-old United States of America and the […]

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The Amazing Rich Culture Of Brothels And Prostitution In Ancient Rome.

September 1, 2012

  Rome was surprisingly progressive regarding prostitution. They saw sex as a human drive that does not necessarily imprecate those who take part in it. Some believe that a bacchanalian cult from somewhere else brought the celebration and constant access of sexual congress in the second century BCE. The notion that somehow paid sexual congress […]

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Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Augustus, The Pretend Gladiator.

July 2, 2012

    Sources: Dark History of the Roman Emperors, From Julius Caesar to The Fall of Rome, Michael Kerrigan. Amber Books, 2008. Wikipedia., Tumblr   Related Posts:Gladiators Didn’t Have It All That Bad.Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus, Roman Historian, Writes About Roman Military Power.The Unintended Consequences of Conquest.The Short Lived Chaotic Dacian Empire.In Early Rome Celtic […]

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Samnite Body Armor.

May 12, 2012

Samnites lived in south central Italy region of south or south and central Italy in Roman times, in a territory around the Appenines. The Samnites were the first robust competition for the early Roman Republic. They wore armored body plates, carried round eliptical shields and wielded a spear and a curved blade knife. They were […]

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Alaric.

November 16, 2011

August 23rd 410 AD. Alaric The Goth is at the gates of Rome. Tomorrow, the world will end. Rome at this time had for 800 years represented the highest ideals of Western Civilization. They had cities and taxation systems, and international trade and shipping and manufacturing  and coliseums and running water and plumbing. The Roman […]

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The Battle of Adrianople. 378 AD.

July 28, 2011

Arriving Gothic cavalry poured in from behind at this unfortunate timing and the Roman order of battle on their right flank crumbled. The Romans retreated to the base of the hill where the Goths were assembled and there they were surrounded and all killed. Other portions of the Roman line held for a time and made headway. But 4 PM, the rest of the Gothic cavalry poured in and routed the Romans. As many as 25,000 Romans may have been killed. Valens, himself was abandoned by his guards and died on the battlefield.

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Roman Politics Prior To The Roman Civil War

June 20, 2011

In 69 BC, Caesar married Sulla’s daughter, consolidating the power of two dynastic families. During his early years when he ran afoul of powerful people he survived because also was a famous and powerful but didn’t have the wealth needed to grow into a political power.

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The Aegates Islands Ambush. The End Of The First Punic War.

April 14, 2011

Rome and Carthage, two great seagoing nations with huge armies and tremendous wealth both existed within each others sphere of influence. The three major wars fought between them was inevitable. The outcomes were not. But the first war went to the Romans. This was the last battle. In 241, at the end of the First […]

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Rome, Towards The End.

November 6, 2010

At the beginning of the 5th century AD, Alaric stood at the gates of Rome and legionnaires stood arrayed against them, dressed in full combat regalia on the other side of the wall. Along the outskirts of the Empire, legionnaires faced other barbarian tribesmen along the frozen Rhine river. The Romans stood in order, each […]

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Gladiators Didn’t Have It All That Bad.

August 11, 2010

These Roman slaves and prisoners provided bloody combative entertainment to Roman masses for three hundred years. First appearing in 400 BC, gladiatorial combat was a hit from the moment the Romans started it. Given that the Romans were considered the most civilized culture of their time, it is also proper to note that they were […]

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The Battle of Lake Trasimene

November 7, 2009

After the Roman defeat at Trebbia, the Roman Senate actually feared that the Carthaginian army, currently wreaking havoc in the countryside to the north would swoop down onto the gates of Rome itself. Rome had never been invaded by a large competent army. This was a first in Roman history. By now, he had defeated […]

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