Lincoln

Post image for Abraham Lincoln Letter To General Hurlbut Outlining His Dream Of  A Negro Army

  TELEGRAM TO GENERAL S. A. HURLBUT. WASHINGTON, March 25, 1863. MAJOR-GENERAL HURLBUT, Memphis: What news have you? What from Vicksburg? What from Yazoo Pass? What from Lake Providence? What generally? QUESTION OF RAISING NEGRO TROOPS TO GOVERNOR JOHNSON. (Private.) EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON March 26, 1863. HON. ANDREW JOHNSON. MY DEAR SIR:–I am told you […]

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      Chief of the Chiricahua Apaches: Victorio   The United States Army in the West feared the Apaches as much as they feared any Indian. Perhaps the Comanches commanded that much respect, but the Apaches were not just fearsome in the movies and on TV. They expunged any feelings of sympathy from settlers […]

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The Day Lincoln Was Almost Hit By A Sniper.

February 11, 2013

  Abraham Lincoln at Antietam   In 1864, once again the Shenandoah Valley was filled with the throaty echoes of cannon fire as a Confederate force once again muscled its way towards Western Maryland and Southern Pennsylvania. Jubal Early almost brought a massed cavalry regiment into Washington but was intimidated by the formidable Union earthworks […]

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The Day Ulysses S. Grant Expelled Jews from Paducah, Kentucky.

May 11, 2012

    Jonathan D. Sarna’s book, “When General Grant Expelled the Jews,” is about General Orders No. 11. Argument endures about what Grant meant, how much damage his order inflicted and how significant this act of explicit antisemitism really was. He uses the words use the words “profiteer” and “Jew” interchangeably whilst ordering the expulsion […]

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The Fact Mary Surratt Was A Woman Did Not Help Her In The Trials After Lincoln’s Assassination.

May 4, 2011

Lincoln was no fool. During his presidency assassinations were going on all around the world. Two Russian Czars were assassinated, an emperor in Mexico was shot and killed, the presidents of the Honduras and Colombia, the King of Afghanistan, and the English Prime Minister. And attempts were made on  Andrew Jackson and Queen Victoria. Lincoln […]

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Interesting. Nothing Really Changes Does It?

January 30, 2011
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“Trusting to escape scrutiny, by fixing the public gaze upon the exceeding brightness of military glory – that attractive rainbow, that rises in showers of blood – that serpent’s eye, that charms to destroy-he plunged into war.” Kurt Vonnegut quotes Congressman Abraham Lincoln’s criticism of President Polk’s war mongering in Mexico in his book A […]

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The Emancipation Proclamation, On This Day 1863. This Is It In Full.

January 1, 2011

A Transcription By the President of the United States of America: A Proclamation. Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: “That on the first […]

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Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose

September 12, 2009

“The new pilot was hurried to the helm in the midst of a tornado.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson, speaking about Abraham Lincolns’ first days in office assessing the secession of South Carolina from the Union. . . “He’s an idealist in an age of cynicism, a conciliator at a time of cleaving. He strives to appeal […]

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Poster From 1845

September 6, 2009

Found this facsimile just surfing the net. Related Posts:Abraham Lincoln Letter To General Hurlbut Outlining His Dream Of A Negro ArmyThe Amazing World War I Propaganda Art Of Louis Raemakers.Bouyed By The Win Over The Confederates, The US Cavalry Was Flummoxed By The Apaches. A story about Victorio, Hembrillo Basin and the Buffalo Soldiers. US […]

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Antietam. The Bloodiest Day In American Combat History.

July 6, 2009

September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, It was the bloodiest single-day battle in all of American history, on US soil or off with about 23,000 casualties. The overall strategy looked like this. Jefferson Davis and Robert E Lee were conducting defensive warfare, hoping to bait the North into invading the South. They thought a northern […]

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