Aetius

The Battle Of The Catalaunian Fields. 451 AD.

by Daniel Russ on November 10, 2011

Now come the Huns, a barbarian group like no other. These were the best horsemen the Romans had ever seen. Either Roman garrisons could not stop them, many cobbled together from reserve forces in the hinterlands of the fading Empire. No other Germanic tribe could standup to them either. They were mostly a cavalry army but the maneuvered with such deftness and force that the classical infantry formations of the Roman era just could not keep up with them on a battlefield. They were merciless killers who rarely negotiated anything. They simply showed up and took what they wanted and killed everyone, men, women, children. Some women were kept but for the most part there was no mercy meted out whatsoever. Attila himself was like a monster out of a folktale. He was short, hairy, swarthy, utter charismatic, and as fine a horsemen as any he rode with. His men wore furs, goatskin leggings, fur hats and caps; they carried a compound bow, bone tipped arrows, rope, sometimes a long spear and a knife. They painted and scarred their own faces to make themselves to look minatory. They were descended from Mongol tribesmen and related to other Asiatic bands. Nomadic and clannish, around the 5th century, the Huns decided that they needed more land and launched attacks on the Goth with ferocity never seen. The Goths fled across the Rhine into the Balkans, then Thrace. Now everyone in Rome was paying attention.

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