May 2012

Post image for Luke Pryor Blackburn. Physician. Philanthropist. Assassin.

  Born in 1816 in Kentucky, Luke Blackburn became a physician. During his practice he became famous for treating Yellow Fever that exploded into epidemiological disasters every few years when construct projects sprang up along rivers. In 1848 he became famous for an effective quarantine of yellow Fever patients that stopped the spread of the […]

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Post image for George S. Patton Was The Most Interesting Man In The World.

    He was born George Smith Patton, the son with an illustrious family tree that skeins back all the way to George Washington and the American Revolution. Patton listened to the stories told in his home about cavalry battle by John Singleton Mosby a cavalry officer who served with Jeb Stuart in the Confederate […]

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Eerie Haunting Black & White Photos Of Atomic Bomb Testing Grounds.

May 29, 2012

    During the 1950s the United States detonated 739 nuclear weapons around the world in remote and unpopulated places. Often the scientists and civil engineers built entire village wholly unoccupied save for mannequins positioned as if in a moment frozen in time. This was done to help study the need for protecting a population […]

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Remember.

May 28, 2012

    Happy Memorial Day     Source: Google Images   Related Posts:Veterans And D-DayA Thoughtful Memorial Day To You.A Project To Record The Stories Of Every Living WWII Veteran

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In A Battle You’ve Probably Never Heard Of, George S. Patton Restored Our Confidence That We Could Beat The Germans.

May 27, 2012

    The Battle of the Kasserine Pass was the worst battlefield loss for the US in WWII. American commanders wanted to see green GIs get a taste of the Wehrmacht. Major General Lloyd Frendenhall was the US commander; mostly known as a trainer of troops he had seen little combat. He spread his lines […]

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Highlights From The Complex And Diverse Falklands Islands War.

May 26, 2012

  The British invested troops at San Carlos on the west end of East Falkland. They were waiting for heavy lift helicopters to be put into place at Port Stanley, 50 miles away at the east end of east island.  More than a dozen of the helicopters were in the Atlantic Conveyor a vast container […]

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The Falklands Islands War Was A Distraction From Not One Bad Economy, But Two.

May 25, 2012

For over a century, Great Britain and Argentina laid claim to the Falklands Islands, two islands 400 miles East of the southern tip of Argentina. The Argentines call them the Malvinas, and replevined them from Britain in early 1982. It was a simple act one Friday morning on April 2nd, 1982; over a 100 Argentine […]

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The Boer War Was A Replay Of History. Part 2.

May 24, 2012

  The Boer Army inflicted thousands of casualties on advancing British regiments, and beat back many attempts to take high ground. The Boers of course were fighting in their own backyard and knew the terrain intimately. In many ways the Boer War was just a long controlled retreat of a smaller force from an Empire;and […]

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The Boer War Was A Replay Of History. Part 1.

May 23, 2012

    Remarkable similarities color the army recruitment from the United States during the Vietnam conflict and British recruitment into the Boer Wars. Prospects themselves often had little few prospects. Vietnam recruited both from suburbia’s and ghettos, but suburban kids often found deferments and so the ranks were often comprised largely of inner city youth. […]

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Dingane Versus Pretorious.

May 22, 2012

  Andries Wilhelmus Jacobus Pretorius was Boer leader who actually helped form the Transvaal State. He came to power about the same time that Dingane killed Shaka Zulu and rose to power as the heir apparent to the empire. Dingane did not have the charismas that Shaka Zulu did. He lacked the salesmanship, the political […]

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The Russians Scared Western Empires So Badly, France And England Fought On The Same Side In The Crimean War.

May 21, 2012

Russia was a behemoth, a power just by virtue of its immense size, its immense army and the one seventh of the surface of the Earth it had purview over. While Russians battled over whether Russia would be a Tsarist monarchy or a Republic, or a Marxist state, the Tsar was land grabbing. In the […]

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The Urumui. India’s Flexible Sword

May 20, 2012

        The Indians of the Mid  Ages invented some of t he world’s strangest weapons. The Urumi was no exception. A sword wrought out of a band of flexible steel, it was also called the Chuttval. In the southern Indian art of Kalaripayat, the Urumi was the art taught only to the […]

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The Soviet T-35 Heavy Tank Was An Early Disaster.

May 19, 2012

        In December 1930, the Soviet Office of Motorization and Mechanization (PMR) ordered the development of a heavy tank to work with the Red Army.  It was a 50 ton behemoth with five turrets. In fact the T-365 was the only five turreted tank in history. Development was almost impossible simply because […]

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The Bristol 188 “Flaming Pencil”

May 18, 2012

      This stainless steel juggernaut was a test bed aircraft and the hope was that the research would give the British aeronautical engineers a way to build better materials and structure for sustained Mach flight. The idea was to create plane that could climb to over 50,000 feet and and fly at transonic […]

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The Jagdpanzer 38t, Or Hetzer Anti Tank Assault Gun

May 17, 2012

  The Hetzer was offically known as the Jagdpanzer 38t. It was a tank killer, or anti armor assault gun. The Germans took a high velocity 75mm gun and mounted it on the Czech 38t tank chassis and fielded almost 3000 of thee guns. People might perhaps wonder what role the assault gun actually played. […]

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Switzerland’s Secret Alpine Bunkers.

May 16, 2012

  The Swiss have an excuse for avoiding the consequences of endless centuries of warfare in Europe. They’re neutral, and they have managed to maintain a neutrality to all things warfare. The Swiss terrain itself is hostile to standing parade ground armies.  The huge open vistas and steep Alpine passes were never good idea for […]

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Shaka (kaSenzangakhona) Zulu. The African Ghengis Khan.

May 15, 2012

  The enigmatic thing about Shaka Zulu is that there seems to be little or no easily recognizable impetus for his new methods of leadership. There was no over reaching geopolitical movement afoot that midwifed his new sense of governance. No one declared that things would improve with a military dictator. No one really knows […]

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The Maresal Romanian Anti Tank Gun

May 14, 2012

  This thing should have worked. Like so many weapons systems before it, it simply needed the budgets, the time, the political atmosphere to let it happen. The idea itself was quite robust. A self propelled sloped armor anti tank gun, the size of which was planned to be a 120 mm howitzer. It was […]

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The Caproni-Stipa Ducted Fan.

May 13, 2012

  It looked kind of cool actually, like a barrel and when you consider that Italians built it in 1932, it’s really really cool. The Caproni- Stipa was basically a hollow tube ducted fan engine. It’s performance was mediocre so the Italian Air Force demurred further advancement on the ducted fan experiments. This is proof […]

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Samnite Body Armor.

May 12, 2012

Samnites lived in south central Italy region of south or south and central Italy in Roman times, in a territory around the Appenines. The Samnites were the first robust competition for the early Roman Republic. They wore armored body plates, carried round eliptical shields and wielded a spear and a curved blade knife. They were […]

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