September 2010

Tony Curtis, United States Navy Veteran, Has Passed Away.

by Daniel Russ on September 30, 2010

Inspired by Cary Grant’s performance in a movie entitled Destination Tokyo, Tony Curtis joined the United States Navy. He served during World War II on the USS Proteus (AS-19) a Fulton Class ship known as a submarine tender, basically a ship designed to support submarine operations and the resupply and repair of submarines. According to […]

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XF-103 Thunderwarrior

by Daniel Russ on September 30, 2010

The F-100 Super Sabre was the first of the Century Series aircraft planned to upgrade long term the United States capabilities in interception and BVR interdiction. The F-101 Voodoo was the next plane and then the F-102 Delta Dart. The F-103 never made it to the prototypes, but it was an ambitious project to create […]

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A Little Help From Friends

September 29, 2010

It’s not hard to underestimate the effects of the United States industrial machine had on World War II. I am still tabulating this figure but I have estimated that between 1939 and 1945, The United States manufactured just under 200,000 aircraft. Not only that, over half of these aircraft were designed after Pearl Harbor. I […]

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War Art

September 28, 2010

Related Posts:Shotgun EngravingsConcept Tanks. Click To Enlarge.Engraved Handguns. Click to Enlarge.Tsuba.The A2 Bomber Jacket Was Often A Canvas II.

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Pterodactyls Of World War II

September 27, 2010

I was watching the History Channel a few months ago and ther two old grizzled WWII veterans were talking about a Pterydactyl they saw while sent to reconnoiter Japanese troops in Papua New Guinea. I started scrubbing around and found some things. During World War II, an American soldier walked into a clearing near Finschhafen […]

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War Art: Russia Vs. Japan

September 26, 2010

Interesting depictions of the upcoming Russian/Japanese conflict which often relate to the attack on Port Arthur. Czar Nicholas II asked his cabinet to hire artists to begin painting racist depictions of the Japanese. These were printed and handed out in the streets of Russia, meant to appeal to a large working class and an illiterate […]

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Otto Dix

September 25, 2010

Otto Dix was a German painter who was born in 1891 and died in 1969. He was attached to a German field artillery unit during World War I which he signed up for with some alacrity. He took part in the Battle of the Somme. He emerged from World War I absolutely haunted by the […]

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Teddy Roosevelt’s Bigfoot

September 24, 2010

Theodore Roosevelt wrote a book called Wildeness Hunter. It’s free on many ebook sites. This is his Bigfoot story. “Frontiersmen are not, as a rule, apt to be very superstitious. They lead lives too hard and practical, and have too little imagination in things spiritual and supernatural. I have heard but few ghost stories while […]

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Foo Fighters

September 23, 2010

Foo Fighters     November 1944, Allied pilots in the skies over Germany began seeing small flying luminous objects maneuver around their strike formations. Pilots reported that the objects were white, orange or red and seemed to be under intelligent control. Pilots also reported that they could out accelerate and out maneuver any plane in […]

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Now I Have Seen Everything

September 22, 2010

Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

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Ruminations On Knights

September 21, 2010

Knights had an analogue organization in modern America. Ostensibly they were there to protect the weak, orphans, widows, and the poor, later to reclaim Jerusalem for Christianity. Often they were little more than killers, other times they were cagey military contractors, and once in a while they performed their mission. In reality they were given […]

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The I-401, Submarine/Aircraft Carrier Was A Japanese Secret Weapon. It Was Also Almost Used On Us.

September 20, 2010

The story about secret weapons is always fascinating. What is amazing is how close our enemies came from using them to good effect. We wrote a few years ago about the odd looking BV 141 long range bomber that came within miles of Manhattan. You’d be surprised how close Japan came to launching an air […]

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Facing Ali

September 19, 2010

I just watched an amazing documentary called Facing Ali, about ten fighters who got into the ring against the champion; some who vanquished him and some who fell. It’s a wild, heady ride into a time when one man was a bigger attraction than all the PR firms assembled in the entire world could produce. […]

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First Contact

September 18, 2010

July 21 1921, Mayflower Pilgrims stumble onto a small village of Wampanoags Indians living in a place they called Patuxet. Frank Winslow, a few men from his settlement, all armed with Arquebuses make first contact. It must have been odd for Massasoit, the chief. Whilst fishing in the lush cold waters of the New England […]

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We Could All Learn A Thing Or Two From Winston Churchill

September 17, 2010

“You ask, What is our policy? I will say; “It is to wage war, by sea, land and air, with all our might and with all the strength that God can give us: to wage war against a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark lamentable catalogue of human crime. That is our policy.” You […]

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The Only Rocket Powered Fighter In The World. The Messerschmitt Me-163 Komet.

September 16, 2010

Brilliant Dr. Alexander Lippisch created the this radical rocket powered design while working for Messerschmitt. Following the designed of the DFS -194 glider, Lippisch made this batwing design that lacked rear horizontal stabilizers. Powered by a rocket motor with up to 1653lb thrust the Komet tore through Allied bomber formations at over 500 mph. Because […]

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On The Road To Stalingrad

September 15, 2010

It’s May 1942, at Wolfsshanze, Hitler’s rugged Command bunker in the forested hills of East Prussia. There Halder meets with Hitler and a host of other German commanders who are there to plan then next major offensive now that Barbarossa was such a monumental military success. This moment was the very pinnacle for the German […]

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The Terrible Retreat From Kabul To Gandamek

September 14, 2010

We’ve talked here a lot about the anti-colonial movement that began in the early 18th century in British Protectorates and occupied territories. It began slowly with rebellions and small military losses around the British Empire and accelerated after World War II. A century before it could be said that the sun never set on the […]

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Somali Pirates Take Shipping Freighter, US Marines Take It Back

September 13, 2010

“(AP) DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — U.S. Marine commandos stormed a pirate-held cargo ship off the Somalia coast Thursday, reclaiming control and taking nine prisoners without firing a shot in the first such boarding raid by the international anti-piracy flotilla, U.S. Navy officials said. The mission – using small craft to reach the deck of […]

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The Charge Of The Light Brigade

September 12, 2010

The Battle of Balaclava raged in 1854. On the 25th of October, French light cavalry and English light cavalry were amassed on the battlefield facing East where Russian Commander Pavel Liprandi had 20 infantry battalions and fifty pieces of artillery, all of Liprandi’s forces were famous and blooded Cossack units. The English cavalry assembled there […]

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