Roman History

Fatima Comments On Valens.

June 30, 2012
Thumbnail image for Fatima Comments On Valens.

In my post about Adrianople , a reader named Fatima responded. This is fascinating. Valens was a suprisingly good administrator, and no better or worse than most of his generation of “Romans” at generaling, but by the time of Adrianople, the Roman army, especially the Balkan units, was a poorly organized hodgepodge of differently equipped […]

Share
Read the full article →

Samnite Body Armor.

May 12, 2012

Samnites lived in south central Italy region of south or south and central Italy in Roman times, in a territory around the Appenines. The Samnites were the first robust competition for the early Roman Republic. They wore armored body plates, carried round eliptical shields and wielded a spear and a curved blade knife. They were […]

Share
Read the full article →

When Julius Caesar Moved Troops Into A Nearby Encampment, The Treveri Gauls Promptly Evacuated.

January 26, 2012

    Hunnerings                 Recently near Hermeskeil, a town 24 miles away from Trier, archeologists uncovered enough evidence to support the notion that the ruins they found are indeed the oldest known Roman marching camp in Germany to day. It is a massive affair at around 50 acres […]

Share
Read the full article →

Spartacus.

October 19, 2011

In 72 BC one in three Romans was a slave. So roughly two million slaves attended to the needs of four million Romans. A slave was considered property. A slave’s life and well-being depended on the whims of the masters of the household. Slaves couldn’t own property or vote or testify in a courtroom. If […]

Share
Read the full article →

The Battle of Adrianople. 378 AD.

July 28, 2011

Arriving Gothic cavalry poured in from behind at this unfortunate timing and the Roman order of battle on their right flank crumbled. The Romans retreated to the base of the hill where the Goths were assembled and there they were surrounded and all killed. Other portions of the Roman line held for a time and made headway. But 4 PM, the rest of the Gothic cavalry poured in and routed the Romans. As many as 25,000 Romans may have been killed. Valens, himself was abandoned by his guards and died on the battlefield.

Share
Read the full article →

Boudica.

July 26, 2011

The Queen of the Iceni was betrayed and brutalized by the Romans. So she put together an army and smashed a Roman Legion, and burned three Roman occupied cities.   Boudica, was “possessed of greater intelligence than often belongs to women”, that she was tall, had hair described as reddish-brown or tawny hanging below her […]

Share
Read the full article →

Roman Marching Camps

April 20, 2011

The outpost supply and harbor system is a military concept created by the Romans. They were the first real empire to put in place forward operating bases deep in occupied territory. Once the Romans had to occupy Gaul and return to quell uprisings they also needed a place to retreat to when they were overwhelmed […]

Share
Read the full article →

The Aegates Islands Ambush. The End Of The First Punic War.

April 14, 2011

Rome and Carthage, two great seagoing nations with huge armies and tremendous wealth both existed within each others sphere of influence. The three major wars fought between them was inevitable. The outcomes were not. But the first war went to the Romans. This was the last battle. In 241, at the end of the First […]

Share
Read the full article →

A Letter From A Roman Soldier To His Father.

March 21, 2011

A Roman soldier named Apion from a small town in Egypt, traveled to Alexandria and enlisted in the Roman army. He boarded a troop transport and travelled to Italy where he was deployed for duty. He writes this letter home. Apion to  his father and lord Epimachos: Many good wishes! First of all I hope […]

Share
Read the full article →

Roman Recruit Writes Home Around 30 BC.

February 3, 2011

This kid is inducted into the Roman Navy from another city state, probably Greeks fighting for the Romans. He is in the ancient Roman Port City of Misenum, around Naples today. Apollinarius to Taesis, his mother and lady, many greetings! Before all I pray for your health. I myself am well, and make supplication for […]

Share
Read the full article →

Reading Josephus.

January 20, 2011

  Flavian Josephus   Its amazing how nothing ever changes. I downloaded Josephus’ work, The Wars of the Jews on a free ebook site. and in his very first complaint, he cavils the other sources of accounts of the Judean revolt as wildly inaccurate and filled with bias. He lambasts them, he says they were […]

Share
Read the full article →

Pompeii Structure That Housed Gladiators Collapses.

November 7, 2010

What a shame. This thousands of years  old structure collapsed today. It’s not like this just history, this is major tourism magnet and Italy is one of the largest tourist destinations of Europe, certainly one of the largest in Italy. Being of the opinion that what has happened will be repeated, and what has happened […]

Share
Read the full article →

History Carved In Stone

October 17, 2010

Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

Share
Read the full article →

Gladiators Didn’t Have It All That Bad.

August 11, 2010

These Roman slaves and prisoners provided bloody combative entertainment to Roman masses for three hundred years. First appearing in 400 BC, gladiatorial combat was a hit from the moment the Romans started it. Given that the Romans were considered the most civilized culture of their time, it is also proper to note that they were […]

Share
Read the full article →

The Gladius Or Roman Short Sword, Probably The Weapon That Resulted In More Death Than Any Weapon In Ancient History

July 16, 2010

  Roman Short Swords .   Glasius, Roman Short Sword     Gladius Roman Short Sword ..   Related Posts:Gladiators Didn’t Have It All That Bad.

Share
Read the full article →

The Fall Of Masada Audio Podcast

April 19, 2010

Click Here For The CMIG Masada Podcast Related Posts:Masada.

Share
Read the full article →

If You Can’t Beat ’em, Build A Wall Around ’em.

January 17, 2010

Vercingetorix was a swashbuckling, charismatic king of the Arverni Gauls who bucked under ham handed Roman rule, and like his father Celtillus, he united a group of Gallic tribesmen to form an army to resist the Romans and drive them out of the land. They both failed ultimately. He came to power in 52 BC […]

Share
Read the full article →

The Scutum

January 14, 2010

Re-enactments Of Roman Formations Polybius describes the Roman Shield in  Histories “The Roman shield is a curved outward surface of which measures two and a half feet in width and four feet in length, the thickness at the rim being a palm’s breadth. It is made of two planks glued together, the outer surface being […]

Share
Read the full article →

Military Anecdote of the Day

June 9, 2009

Ulysses S. Grant was often unkempt and shabbily dressed. Once upon entering a tavern on a wintry evening in Galena, Illinois, he came upon a large group of attorneys who were there for a court session. They were gathered around the hearth. One attorney looked up and pronounced: “Here’s a stranger gentleman and by the […]

Share
Read the full article →

The German Bomber That Almost Reached Manhattan.

June 9, 2009

If you want to make a movie about WWII fighter warfare you have to know that there are still thousands of well maintained WWII aircraft around, except for the models that didn’t survive or for some reason adapt well to modern air travel and air combat. Like flying boats. And if you were to make […]

Share
Read the full article →