Roman History

Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus, Roman Historian, Writes About Roman Military Power.

March 9, 2014

    . No one really knows much about this Roman chronicler of Roman methods of warfare. Hew rote two tomes and that is all we have of him.: Epitoma rei militaries  and Digesta Artis Mulomedicinae, a treaty on animal medicine. .“The Lacedaemonians, the Athenians, the Marsians, the Samnites, the Peligni….Did not the Epirots acquire in former times […]

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The Betrayal Of Herman The German. A Teachable Lesson On Occupations.

February 6, 2014

    “The Germans themselves I should regard as aboriginal….but the Gauls were more formidable.” Tactitus noted. He thought the Gaul had good organizational skills. Their settlements were small but efficient and everyone was busy with the tasks of life. The Germans on the other hand seemed to live within boundaries that only they could […]

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The Short Lived Chaotic Dacian Empire.

October 30, 2013
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  Decebalus, King Of Dacia   In 43 AD, Claudius invaded Britain, eyeing the island nation as a source for wealth and of course the glory of battles won and expanded Roman territory. It had been a century since Julius Caesar added thousands of miles to the Roman Empire. Claudius got what he never wanted, […]

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In Early Rome Celtic Mercenaries Had No Fidelity To Anyone, Even Their Own Tribesmen.

October 18, 2013

    Brennus, Celtiberia Chief Most of Western Europe from the 5th Century BC to the 1st Century was a pastiche of  fiefdoms and tribal bands and clans and allegiances. The Gauls or the Celtic people, as the Romans referred to them were a widely diverse group that for some reason, began raiding Roman Imperial […]

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Boudica and Suetonius.

October 3, 2013

    Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus   Prasutagus and Boudica were the king and queen of the large British tribe called the Iceni. These hunter gatherer people lived in the Southwest of England in bands not too different from our own American Indians, and they probably lived this way since the Neolithic era. They had complex […]

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Procopious Thought That Emperor Justinian Was Actually A Demon.

May 31, 2013
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  Justinian     Procopious: “That Justinian was not a man but a demon in human shape may be abundantly proved  by considering the normity of evils which he afflicted upon mankind, for the power of the acting cause is manifested in the excessive atrocity of his actions. I think that God alone could accurately […]

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Procopious, The Tell All Historian Who Told Wrote An Official History, And The True Story.

May 28, 2013

  Procopius was a Roman citizen born in Roman Palestine from 500 AD to 560 AD. He was most likely classically trained in Greek and Latin and as he became a scholar. The emperor Justinian and the Empress Theodora made him the official historian of the Roman Byzantine court. He kept essentially two historical records. […]

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Masada.

May 17, 2013

  When you walk up to Masada, you can see that Israeli tour guides have finally decided to put some railing where there was no railing for 2000 years. The walk up to Masada is daunting. Soldiers fresh out of military training walk up the snake path and are sworn in at the top of […]

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Yes, They Never Forget.

February 18, 2013

      Classical Age War Elephant Coin     King Pyrrus of Epirus favored the use of war elephants in battle. He was many times in his life fond on a war elephant himself. He first came upon them when campaigning in India for his cousin Alexander. The Greeks preferred Indian elephants, which were […]

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Gladiators, The World’s First Superstar Athletes.

February 15, 2013

  Gladiators from the Zliten Mosaic   People often have the wrong idea about gladiators. The movies for most people are the only open window on the past that we will go through willingly. Thank you History Channel.  So the gladiator as a captured slave, made to fight to the death, is a meme that […]

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The Battle Of Telamon. If Rome Lost This Battle It Might Not Have Survived.

February 7, 2013

  Gallic Armor One of the major forces outside of Rome’s borders was the Gauls. Long before many Gallic tribes were assimilated under Roman rule and even served in the Roman Army, they were the nemesis of the Republic. Polybius writes about a massive Gallic invasion in 225 BC with a force of 50,000-foot soldiers […]

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Forget The Comparisons Between The United States And Ancient Rome. The Differences Are More Telling.

January 2, 2013

    I love the comparisons historians draw between the United States and the Roman Empire. As the turn of the Millennium fades into the past the year-end brings knee jerk dramatic analyses of the last twelve months. Increasingly, and almost inevitably there is a comparison between the 230-year-old United States of America and the […]

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Roman Jewelry Discovered In Japanese Tomb.

December 29, 2012
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Glass Bead Ornament Found In Ancient Japanese Tomb.   In Fifth Century Japan, in what was deemed a “Utukushi” burial mound in Nagaoka, near Kyoto, researchers have discovered something remarable. They a collection of delicate glass beads about fve millimeter in diameter, some in the shape of wheels or flower buds. Scientists in japan say […]

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The Amazing Rich Culture Of Brothels And Prostitution In Ancient Rome.

September 1, 2012

  Rome was surprisingly progressive regarding prostitution. They saw sex as a human drive that does not necessarily imprecate those who take part in it. Some believe that a bacchanalian cult from somewhere else brought the celebration and constant access of sexual congress in the second century BCE. The notion that somehow paid sexual congress […]

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Livia Augustus’ Hair Bun.

August 18, 2012

  In the first century AD politics roiled hotly through Rome. Around 42 BC, the Roman Senate, the wake of the murder of Julius Caesar, declared that Caesar had been a God; and so it was partly by divine imprimatur that Octavian, Caesar’s adopted son, and Mark Anthony and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus were appointed as […]

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The Roman Emperors Weren’t Warring With Other Nations, They Were Warring With Themselves.

July 18, 2012

  In the first century AD politics roiled hotly through Rome. Around 42 BC, the Roman Senate, the wake of the murder of Julius Caesar, declared that Caesar had been a God; and so it was partly by divine imprimatur that Octavian, Caesar’s adopted son, and Mark Anthony and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus were appointed as […]

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Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Augustus, The Pretend Gladiator.

July 2, 2012

    Sources: Dark History of the Roman Emperors, From Julius Caesar to The Fall of Rome, Michael Kerrigan. Amber Books, 2008. Wikipedia., Tumblr   Related Posts:Gladiators Didn’t Have It All That Bad.Tacitus. HistoriesRome’s Imperial Power Was Expressed In Its Architecture.Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus, Roman Historian, Writes About Roman Military Power.The Unintended Consequences of Conquest.

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Fatima Comments On Valens.

June 30, 2012
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In my post about Adrianople , a reader named Fatima responded. This is fascinating. Valens was a suprisingly good administrator, and no better or worse than most of his generation of “Romans” at generaling, but by the time of Adrianople, the Roman army, especially the Balkan units, was a poorly organized hodgepodge of differently equipped […]

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Samnite Body Armor.

May 12, 2012

Samnites lived in south central Italy region of south or south and central Italy in Roman times, in a territory around the Appenines. The Samnites were the first robust competition for the early Roman Republic. They wore armored body plates, carried round eliptical shields and wielded a spear and a curved blade knife. They were […]

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When Julius Caesar Moved Troops Into A Nearby Encampment, The Treveri Gauls Promptly Evacuated.

January 26, 2012

    Hunnerings                 Recently near Hermeskeil, a town 24 miles away from Trier, archeologists uncovered enough evidence to support the notion that the ruins they found are indeed the oldest known Roman marching camp in Germany to day. It is a massive affair at around 50 acres […]

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