Napoleonic Wars

    .   .   The Mexican Army of the 19th century wore single breasted jackets with dark blue and had red collar and red cuffs. Jackets  and pants in the summer were cotton and in the winter they were wool. The Mexican soldado fired a late 18th century pattern musket designed in Britain […]

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Napoleonic Battle Maps. Click To Enlarge.

by Daniel Russ on April 28, 2013

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I love maps and have always been fascinated with ancient maps. These aren’t exactly ancient but they bear the care and skill of the cartographers of the day.                   Sources: Wiki     Save Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

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The Poodle And The Peninsular War

February 16, 2013

  During the Peninsular War, close proximity between troops and citizen often resulted in fraternizations of all sorts. In 1813, a young French matron was curious to see the fearsome British Redcoats assembled near town and showed up with her poodle in her arms. Alarmed, the poodle jumped from her arms and headed barking all […]

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The Ubiquitous Bicorne Hat.

December 15, 2012

The Bircorne Hat     We see it in every great daredevil swashbuckling movie out of the 1950s. We see it in paintings in history books.   It is the bicorne hat.   The father of the bicorne was the tricorne, or three cornered hat. But the bicorne emerged throughout history as the iconic headgear […]

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This Halloween, Enjoy This Ship Made From Human Bones.

October 31, 2012
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Ship Made From Human Bones       Ship Made From Human Bones     Ship Made From Human Bones Given that the French and English warred with each other for centuries it’s a little surprising to hear that French prisoners during the Napoleonic wars were treated fairly well. Many of these prisoners were held […]

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Napoleon’s Mistress.

July 19, 2012

  The Battle of Eylau was one of those victories for the Grande Armee that a commander might prefer not to boast about. Rules of engagement for the 15th through the 19th centuries generally gave the win to who ever stayed on the battlefield, a call not unlike a tie that goes to the runner […]

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Quote Of The Day.

December 30, 2011
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. “Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever.” – Napoleon Bonaparte   . Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

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The Battle Of Trafalgar.

October 10, 2011

The British lost 500 men and another 1400 wounded, but no ships. The French suffered 4500 killed, 7,000 taken prisoner, one ship sunk and 17 ships captured. For now the French would have the advantage on the ground. But the British owned the oceans for the next century.

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A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Battlefield Part II.

September 6, 2011

Getting to the battlefield cost Napoleon one of his biggest defeats. La Grande Armee marched into Moscow with 450,000 men and returned across the Brezhina River with 40,000. Much of the death was simply the Russian winter. The serfs the French mistreated on the way in destroyed most of his army in the way out. Napoleon was literally run out of the country on his horseback. His men starved or succumbed to pneumonia or typhoid. The cost to American troops of just getting to the battlefield was also rather high. They don’t make movies about the troop transports that slipped beneath the waves in rough seas. They don’t talk about a wooden glider that crashes and killed every raw recruit aboard. But this happens. The price of war is not paid in dollars. The price of war is death.

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Josef Radetsky, The Greatest General Of The Hapsburg Dynasty

May 10, 2010

Source: Wikipedia, Military History Magazine Related Posts:Napoleon’s Mistress.Book Review “The True Story Of The Campaigns Of War And Peace” by Dominic LievenA Moment of Grace at the Battle of BorodinoMilitary Anecdote of the Day

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Military Anecdote Day – Uncommon Chivalry

April 26, 2010

This tale bespeaks a sort of understood respect between those of high position even during war. Josephine Bonaparte had started an exotic blooms display at her private garden in Malmaison. During this time, the English were allied against Bonaparte all across Europe. Much blood had been spilled. Yet the Admiralty sent notes that any exotic […]

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Book Review “The True Story Of The Campaigns Of War And Peace” by Dominic Lieven

April 21, 2010

“Brave descendents of courageous Slavs! You always smashed the teeth of the lions and tigers who sought to attack you. Let everyone unite: with the Cross in your hearts and weapons in your hands no human force will defeat you.” With these words, Tsar Alexander I appealed to the Russian people to join the fight […]

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The Revolution Will Be Tweeted. Social Media and the Mideast.

June 17, 2009

My feeling about the US news media is that it is essentially dead. What was once an enterprise about journalism in all its glory was purchased and packaged into a syrupy, sugary strain of actual information that is infotainment. When Twitter scoops the New York Times and ABC and NBC and CBS in Iran because […]

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A Moment of Grace at the Battle of Borodino

June 16, 2009

A wounded soldier cried out. Napolean ordered a stretcher for him.

“It’s a Russian sir,” one of his aides commented.

Napolean commented “After a victory there are no enemies, only men.”

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Military Anecdote of the Day

June 3, 2009

The officers stood and turned their backs on Wellington. An onlooker tried to apologize to the speaker for the rude display.

“Not to worry Madame,” Wellington remarked. “I have seen their backs before.”

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