The American Civil War, A military history detailing the facts, the personalities, the strategies and the tactics and the oddities of America’s only military civil conflict.

The American Civil War was the defining battle in the history of America. It was the end of slavery and the beginning of a truly united country. The bloodshed in the America Civil War was massive. Over 623,000 Americans died and millions were wounded horribly. The entire history of the world was affected by the outcome. In less than a century after the American Civil War, the First and Second World Wars broke out. The rise of the United Sates as a global military power were rooted in the military industrial complex that was born during the 1860s. The liberties outlined in the constitution of the United States of America were cemented in the aftermath of the war.

  “By early December 1862, Grant had zeroed in on Jewish traders as the source of the trouble. During his southward advance, he issued orders that all traders should stay in the rear of his army, but on December 5 he complained to Sherman that “in consequence of the total disregard and evasion of orders […]

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From Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief Book by James M. McPherson History book reminds us that the South had a fraction of the power, and resources of the North at the beginning and at the end of the American Civil War. “At a railroad station in Montgomery on February 16, Jefferson Davis […]

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Sound Familiar?

May 25, 2019
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From: A Fierce Glory: Antietam–The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery” by Justin Martin.     Robert Toombs As the South dug in over states’ rights and slavery, Toombs switched affiliation to the Unionist Party, then the Democrats, becoming increasingly bellicose along the way. His political prospects just kept rising. His rhetoric soared. […]

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How Quickly Things Change On A Battlefield.

May 21, 2019

From: A Fierce Glory: Antietam–The Desperate Battle That Saved Lincoln and Doomed Slavery” by Justin Martin. . “After General Anderson went down, leadership devolved to the brigade’s ranking colonel. This was a man named Charles Tew. An adjutant scurried along the road until he found Tew, whereupon he informed the colonel that he was now […]

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Ulysses S Grant’s Humanity

May 17, 2019
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From “Grant” by Ron Chernow. “Grant had captured an army of at least thirteen thousand men, a record on the North American continent. He showed mercy toward the conquered force, giving them food and letting them keep their sidearms. Avoiding any show of celebration, he refused to shame defeated soldiers and vetoed any ceremony in […]

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Unconditional Surrender

May 12, 2019
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Reading “Grant” by Ron Chernow and wanted to share this quote with you. February 15th, 1862. The Battle at Fort Donelson was the opening salvo in a campaign to clear the Confederate Army out of Middle and Western Tennessee, thereby creating a rout for the North into the heart ion the Confederacy. Brigadier General Simon […]

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BROTHER JONATHAN’S LAMENT FOR SISTER CAROLINE Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894)

April 20, 2019
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What is more beautiful than a poem from Oliver Wendell Holmes?   BROTHER JONATHAN’S LAMENT FOR SISTER CAROLINE Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894) She has gone,-she has left us in passion and pride Our stormy-browed sister, so long at our side! She has torn her own star from our firmament’s glow, And turned on her brother […]

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From The Washington Library Archives. A Union Officer’s Letter Home.

April 16, 2019
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This is a letter home from a Union officer Captain Charles M. Scott letter to his wife, Anna, April 7, 1862. It describes the aftermath of the battle of Shiloh. I will begin the process of interpreting the text. Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

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McClellan’s Oversized Ego.

April 4, 2019
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In the last post we made the point that George McClellan could be insufferable. Here are more granular details in the form of letters and statements telegraphed and recorded. George McClellan, American Battlefield Trust “There’s a temptation to dismiss this as its own form of theater, as disingenuous as one of Prince John’s log cannons. […]

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McClellan vs. Everyone Else.

March 30, 2019
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  George McClellan and Nelly his wife   Lincoln was a pragmatist who wore simple black suits of a country lawyer. George McClellan was a Dandy. He was overly confident, and full of himself. While Robert E. Lee dressed as a Colonel, so as not to be overbearing in his authority. McClellan was anal about […]

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More Oddly Overly Friendly Civil War Portraits

March 21, 2019

                                    Source https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/06/30/civil-war-soldiers/ Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

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Oddly Overly Friendly Civil War Portraits

March 17, 2019
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Source: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/06/30/civil-war-soldiers/ Related Posts:Stay Tunes For Similar Posts

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Harmonicas In the Civil War

March 13, 2019
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It’s quite possible that the first harmonica was invented by the plucky creative Chinese. Hell they created everything else. That said, it wasn’t until a German clockmaker, Matthias Hohner, invented the harmonica. That was 1857. And when it came to the United States, it grew into a wild popularity. And so those movies and TV […]

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Women Who Dressed In Drag To Fight In Antietam.

March 8, 2019
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We have written about women fighting in the American Civil War. In fact I wrote this article on this blog about 8 years ago. Here it is. https://civilianmilitaryintelligencegroup.com/4564/women-as-soldiers-in-the-civil-war Here are some more solid examples of the eight women who dressed in drag and fought at Antietam. Union cavalryman Jack Williams (left) fought in 18 battles […]

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Grant Is Promoted

November 21, 2018
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March 8th, Tuesday 1864, was a cold and windy day in Washington D.C. Entering the lobby of the Willard Hotel, a short, round shouldered middle-aged man, shabbily appointed, taciturn and otherwise unimpressive stood holding the hand of his 13 year old son.  He stood 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighed no more than 140 […]

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Grant And His Demons

September 19, 2018
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As a citizen, Grant failed at perhaps every single endeavor. He failed as a leather worker, as a salesman, and he fell prey to the vagaries of alcoholism. Unkempt and unimpressive in civilian clothing, we often dismissed as a man of the streets. Yet, given command and responsibilities, he was a bit like Churchill- utterly […]

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A Letter About The Gettysburg Address Written In Response To a Post On My Google + CMIG Page.

September 1, 2018
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by Lewis Yingling Thank you for this post. With the 155th anniversary of the Gettysburg campaign going on, the battle’s anniversary coming up in less than a month and the 155th anniversary of the speech coming in November, It is well that we remember this amazing speech and the man who wrote it. Of all […]

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The Fall And Rise of Ulysses S. Grant.

April 3, 2018
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When South Carolina began the uprising against the United States, the fervor for war was also burning effulgent. One of the amazing insights gleaned from From Ron Chernow’s book about Ulysses Grant is that the war began as a political topic engaged by people all over the country in taverns and at work and in […]

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Great Battle Maps

September 11, 2017
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.     The things that distinguish a great battle are either clarity, beauty, or historical documentary importance.  One of the sacraments of the Internet is the access to things like beautifully curated maps of famous battles, and I picked up a few of them to share from Google and Bing and from my collections. […]

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Interesting Quote By Robert E. Lee, Elucidated By A Recent Issue Of The Atlantic.

August 2, 2017
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. “I think it however a greater evil to the white man than to the black race, & while my feelings are strongly enlisted in behalf of the latter, my sympathies are more strong for the former. The blacks are immeasurably better off here than in Africa, morally, socially & physically. The painful discipline they […]

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