This Would NEVER Happen In America.

by Daniel Russ on August 13, 2011

Egyptian Riot Police


Tunisia Turns Off Internet

 

Following a speech in which Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali stated that all censorship of the Internet and traditional media will be halted, Tunisia appears to have shut off its Internet filtering system.

At around 9:45pm local time, Tunisian news site Nawaat reported on Twitter that their site, along with video-sharing sites YouTube and DailyMotion, had been unblocked:

 

http://opennet.net/blog/2011/01/tunisia-shuts-off-internet-filter

 

Lybia Shuts Down Internet

 

Rensys reports that Libya has completely shut down their Internet as of midnight Saturday local time.

“Renesys confirms that the 13 globally routed Libyan network prefixes were withdrawn… and Libya is off the Internet. One Libyan route originated by Telecom Italia directly is still BGP-reachable, but inbound traceroutes appear to die in Palermo. A minority of our peers report some surviving paths through the peering connection between Level3 and Telecom Italia, but traceroutes into those prefixes fail, suggesting that the Libyan cutoff is complete. “

Qaddafi’s Libya is engaging in the strategy that Mubarak’s Egypt used to little effect, clearly hoping for a radically different outcome.

On January 27, as an attempt to interfere with protester communications with each other and with the outside world, Egypt shut down its Internet connections.

However, Telecomix has already provided dial up access for Libyans.

Libya has been wracked by its Feb17 protests for several days, with 84 people killed by security forces, according to Human Rights Watch

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/libya_shuts_down_internet.php

 

Syria Shuts Down Internet

Written on January 31, 2011 by Salem Muhamood

As unrest in Arab countries continues to spread from Tunisia to Egypt, governments are cracking down on one of the chief ways activists have been organizing their protests, and that is by shutting down the internet.  Syria joined Egypt in disrupting its internet service as a pre-emptive action. By such a move the Syrian leadership hopes to prevent the Egyptian and Tunisian unrest from spreading into its own borders.

Controlling the Internet is nothing new in Syria. In previous government interference with the free movement of information Syria has blocked programs that allow people to chat on Facebook from their cell phones. As riots continued to escalate in Tunisia, control of the Internet in Syria became more drastic, and then finally, as the violence spread to Egypt the internet was shut down completely.

In Egypt it is being reported that Facebook, which was used as an organizing tool for the successful demonstrators in Tunisia, as well as in Egypt, has been shut down for days. Since last night Egypt’s internet service has been curtailed entirely.

Syrian officials have denied that the internet is down, but it seems clear that there are at a minimum serious disruptions of service, if not total blocking of internet access.

http://www.mideastnewswire.com/syria-shuts-down-internet-as-fear-of-internal-unrest-rises

 

Egypt Shuts Down The Internet.

In the face of mounting political unrest, Egypt took the unprecedented step of severing all Internet connections and shutting down its cellphone services—with the cooperation of international firms.

Egyptian authorities asked mobile operators to “turn down the network totally,” said Vittorio Calao, chief executive of U.K.-based Vodaphone Group PLC, which owns 55% of Egypt’s largest carrier, Vodafone Egypt.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703956604576110453371369740.html

 

 

San Francisco Transit Police Shut Down Internet

The operators of the Bay Area Rapid Transit subway system temporarily shut down cell service last night in four downtown San Francisco stations to interfere with a protest over a shooting by a BART police officer, a spokesman for the system said today.

“BART staff or contractors shut down power to the nodes and alerted the cell carriers,” James Allison, deputy chief communications officer for BART, told CNET. The move was “one of many tactics to ensure the safety of everyone on the platform,” he said in an initial statement provided to CNET earlier this afternoon.

Activists had planned to protest the fatal shootingof Charles Blair Hill, who BART police said went after them with a knife before an officer shot him on July 3.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-27080_3-20091822-245/s.f-subway-muzzles-cell-service-during-protest/

 

 

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