England’s Many Tailless Monowing Prototypes.

 

Handley_Page_HP75_Manx

 Handley Page 75 Manx
.
It’s odd how creative the British aircraft designers were after World War I. Armstrong Whitworth, Miles, General Aircraft, and Westland were making prototypes of some of the first real X-craft. In particular, the tailless, canard, and swept wing aircraft were fully explored in many iterations.
 
.
The Pterodactyl was the name for a series of X craft designed by Geoffrey T. R. Hill. The motivation really was safety as designers wanted a plane that would resist spinning and stalling, and would have forgiving properties for a pilot trying to recover. The Pterodactyl was a glider at first. Adjustments were made to the wing and the Pterodactyl I was a braced monoplane. The Pterodactyl IV was a larger aircraft with a three seat cabin. It was 44 ft 4 in width and wingspan and 19 ft 6 in length. the Pterodactyl V was a straight on fighter aircraft with a sesquiplane lower wing. the VI model was a V with a pusher propeller configuration. the Pterodactyl VII was a seaplane.
.
There were plans for a large Atlantic crossing passenger aircraft of the monowing design. Oddly. None were fully commissioned.
.
The Miles 35 A has been featured here before. the Miles 39A was another variant of the lighter fighter version the 35B. Essentially the canard design 39A was a bomber. These flew by well, but limited government and private funding was losing the air battle to simpler more conventional designs, cool as these X planes were.
.

300px-Miles_M.39b

MIles 39 B 
.
The General Aircraft GAL 56 series were all essentially monowing tailless research  gliders. They flew, or they flew only on schematic diagrams.
.
The three DeHaviland tailless Swallows were built and tested after World War II? The third variant, the DH 120 became the United Kingdom’s first super sonic plane.
.
It did not stop there. Armstrong Whitworth was building absolutely brand new technology research with laminar-flowering flying wing bombers. The AW52G was featured here.
.
The Handley Page 75 Manx had a tailless pusher propeller configuration that flew very nimbly. Partially swept wings supported vertical stabilizers. 
 

DeHaviland Swallow

DeHaviland Swallow 

.

arm_aw-52

Armstrong Whitworth AW.56

At the end of the day, they were experiments that didn’t pan out, and thusly they won no contracts.

 

.

Share

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *