The Amazing World War I Propaganda Art Of Louis Raemakers.

by Daniel Russ on November 29, 2013

Post image for The Amazing World War I Propaganda Art Of Louis Raemakers.

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

Soon after the outbreak of the First World War, the British government noticed that the Germans were quite deft at shaping messages to promote support for the war effort. We laugh at the obviously transparent contrivances that are offered as casus beli. But we have seen it in our own lifetimes. The apparitions that were the WMDs that never appeared in Iraq, the circumstantial evidence, the disingenuous conflation of events that were simply lies did not stop us from heading to war.

 

 “You furnish the pictures and I’ll furnish the war,” William Randoplh Hearst spruiked to Frederick Remington after lamenting that there was no conflict to speak of, much less to draw.

 

Well the Chancellor of the Exchequer, David Lloyd George formed the British War propaganda Bureau. Charle Masterman administered the program, and he elicited the help of famous Dutch artist Louis Raemakers (April 6, 1869 in July 26, 1956) to create the cartoons. Luis was an ardent anti-German Dutch nationalist who produced hundreds of these. They are amazing. He often dealt with things like refugees, normal people all faltering down a crowded highway, carrying all their possessions, lovers and children in tow.

 

He was put on trail at the behest of the German government for endangering the “neutrality of the Netherlands”. A jury acquitted him. The Germans then put a bounty on his head for 12,000 guilders. Raemakers emigrated to England. His work is a dark and emotional landscape of charcoal, strokes of black on cream colored paper, lyard and perfectly imperfect.

 

source: http://net.lib.byu.edu/~rdh7/wwi/propaganda/index.html, wiki

.

 

 

Louis Raemakers

.

Save

Share

Related Posts:

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: