The Mistel Parasite Aircraft Configuration. Guiding A Bomber With A Fighter.

by Daniel Russ on December 18, 2012

Mistel Parasite Aircraft Configuration

 

Mistel Parasite Aircraft Configuration

 

 

Mistel was a parasite aircraft experimental program conducted by the Luftwaffe. The object of the project was to fill a bomber with explosives, and bring it into the air attached to a smaller fighter on top of the fuselage. The smaller fighter would guide the bomber into the target and release it, where it would be a semi aerodynamic guided missile.

 

Mistel means “Mistletoe”. It was also called the Beethovenn-Great, or the “Beethoven device”.  Also it was called Vati und Sohn, or “Daddy and Son”.

Variations of all configurations existed. Some had a Junkers 88 Bomber below and a Messerschmidt 109 above. Others were an Me-262 above and a Junker 287 below.

 

 

Mistel Parasite Aircraft Configuration

 

Mistel Parasite Aircraft Configuration

 

These parasite strike packages were used dozens of times with negligible results, probably because aiming a bomber with a fighter was harder than it looked and targets were missed.

 

William Green and Gordon Swanborough call these the “prelude to stand-off”. Good analogy.

 

 

Mistel Parasite Aircraft Configuration

 

 

Source: Wikipedia, Darkroastblen, http://www.air-and-space.com

 

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