Odd War Photos.

by Daniel Russ on January 30, 2015

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An abandoned Panzer Mk III that some Soviet Citizen posed a child on.

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Geese pose in front of a Panzer Mark V Panther Tank

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World War I German soldiers ride on an A7V tank

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Some photos have no explanation

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Not really sure what this is.

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Is This The Origin Of Christmas? Ancient Rome?

by Daniel Russ on January 27, 2015

Word for word from a Facebook post:
Juan Miguel Garcia II. How Did Christmas Come to Be Celebrated on December 25?

Roman pagans first introduced the holiday of Saturnalia, a week long period of lawlessness celebrated between December 17-25. During this period, Roman courts were closed, and Roman law dict
ated that no one could be punished for damaging property or injuring people during the weeklong celebration. The festival began when Roman authorities chose “an enemy of the Roman people” to represent the “Lord of Misrule.” Each Roman community selected a victim whom they forced to indulge in food and other physical pleasures throughout the week. At the festival’s conclusion, December 25th, Roman authorities believed they were destroying the forces of darkness by brutally murdering this innocent man or woman.

The ancient Greek writer poet and historian Lucian (in his dialogue entitled Saturnalia) describes the festival’s observance in his time. In addition to human sacrifice, he mentions these customs: widespread intoxication; going from house to house while singing naked; rape and other sexual license; and consuming human-shaped biscuits (still produced in some English and most German bakeries during the Christmas season).

In the 4th century CE, Christianity imported the Saturnalia festival hoping to take the pagan masses in with it. Christian leaders succeeded in converting to Christianity large numbers of pagans by promising them that they could continue to celebrate the Saturnalia as Christians.

The problem was that there was nothing intrinsically Christian about Saturnalia. To remedy this, these Christian leaders named Saturnalia’s concluding day, December 25th, to be Jesus’ birthday.

Christians had little success, however, refining the practices of Saturnalia. As Stephen Nissenbaum, professor history at the University of Massachussetts, Amherst, writes, “In return for ensuring massive observance of the anniversary of the Savior’s birth by assigning it to this resonant date, the Church for its part tacitly agreed to allow the holiday to be celebrated more or less the way it had always been.” The earliest Christmas holidays were celebrated by drinking, sexual indulgence, singing naked in the streets (a precursor of modern caroling), etc.

The Reverend Increase Mather of Boston observed in 1687 that “the early Christians who first observed the Nativity on December 25 did not do so thinking that Christ was born in that Month, but because the Heathens’ Saturnalia was at that time kept in Rome, and they were willing to have those Pagan Holidays metamorphosed into Christian ones.” Because of its known pagan origin, Christmas was banned by the Puritans and its observance was illegal in Massachusetts between 1659 and 1681. However, Christmas was and still is celebrated by most “Christians”.
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More Great Photos.

January 23, 2015

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Some Things Cannot be Explained.

January 19, 2015

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Civil War Musket Rounds Found Inside Dead Crocodile.

January 16, 2015

American crocodiles are thought to live about 80 years. That might be correct. Or to might be completely incorrect. recently crocodile hunters in Mississippi shot and killed a specimen that weighed almost half a ton. While dressing the animal (cleaning it out, and separating the meat from the ofal), the hunters discovered nine spherical lead […]

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The Apollo 7 Command Module

January 13, 2015

  Some 40,000 technicians had to build the Apollo Command Module. It was in its day, the single most complex vehicle ever built. It had to withstand the forces of a massive Saturn V rocket, the pull of the Earth’s gravity, and the impact with the atmosphere at tens of thousands of miles an hour. […]

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England’s Many Tailless Monowing Prototypes.

January 11, 2015

   Handley Page 75 Manx . It’s odd how creative the British aircraft designers were after World War I. Armstrong Whitworth, Miles, General Aircraft, and Westland were making prototypes of some of the first real X-craft. In particular, the tailless, canard, and swept wing aircraft were fully explored in many iterations.   . The Pterodactyl […]

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George Washington On Torture.

January 8, 2015

 “Should any American soldier be so base and infamous as to injure any prisoner. . . I do most earnestly enjoin you to bring him to such severe and exemplary punishment as the enormity of the crime may require. Should it extend to death itself, it will not be disproportional to its guilt at such […]

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WTF

January 5, 2015

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The Battle Of Kadesh. History Is Sometimes Written By The Losers.

January 3, 2015

  Ramses II was not the first Egyptian Pharaoh to bring military power against the Hittite kingdom. He was the most flamboyant for certain. Subbiluliumas, a former Hittite King, had pushed Ramses’ father, Ramses I,  back against the town of Kadesh, which now lies in modern day Syria. So Ramses II, seeking the fame and […]

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